DAFNEplus presented at recent behavioural medicine conference

Earlier this month, the DAFNEplus study delivered its first output. The first piece of work that was undertaken, the expert consensus process on revising the DAFNE curriculum, was presented at the UK Society for Behavioural Medicine (UKSBM) annual conference in Cardiff. A mix of healthcare practitioners, epidemiologists, health and clinical psychologists, medical sociologists and health economists attended the conference.

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Dr Kathryn Hamilton from University College London, presents at UKSBM 2016

The focus of the talk was on our adaptation of a consensus methodology, called the Nominal Group Technique, to achieve agreement between behavioural scientists, DAFNE clinicians and DAFNE educators and patient representatives. We also reported on an outcome of this consensus process; a number of principles and behaviour change techniques that it was agreed will be used in revising the DAFNE programme so that it better supports people in keeping up the skills that are encouraged during the DAFNE programme over the long term.

The focus of the talk was on our adaptation of a consensus methodology, called the Nominal Group Technique, to achieve agreement between behavioural scientists, DAFNE clinicians and DAFNE educators and patient representatives. We also reported on an outcome of this consensus process; a number of principles and behaviour change techniques that it was agreed will be used in revising the DAFNE programme so that it better supports people in keeping up the skills that are encouraged during the DAFNE programme over the long term.

The focus of the talk was on our adaptation of a consensus methodology, called the Nominal Group Technique, to achieve agreement between behavioural scientists, DAFNE clinicians and DAFNE educators and patient representatives. We also reported on an outcome of this consensus process; a number of principles and behaviour change techniques that it was agreed will be used in revising the DAFNE programme so that it better supports people in keeping up the skills that are encouraged during the DAFNE programme over the long term.

Achieving consensus on programme revisions is an important part of working effectively in a multi-disciplinary team developing complex behaviour change interventions, such as DAFNEplus. It is crucial to make sure that all team members and stakeholders are heard, and that their views are accurately represented to ensure that the revised programme meets everyone’s needs. This is a common issue that many research groups working in healthcare face.

Also, because intervention development is a burgeoning area, it’s important that dissemination of research should not be limited to the findings, and to recognise the value of methodological insights. We therefore wanted to share our findings and learning points that could be applied to other behaviour change intervention development contexts, for example weight management and exercise in older adults.

The talk was well received, and networking resulted in some important shared learning. For example, a research group that had recently undertaken a systematic review of principles and techniques for supporting sustained behaviour change in relation to weight loss were happy to share their findings with the DAFNEplus team and this will now feed into the programme redevelopment.

Dr Kathryn Hamilton (née Dennick), University College London

 

Image credits

Michel Curi by CC 2.0

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